Do You Know How To Work Your Camera...?

November 25, 2020

So in this short burst of a blog I thought I'd touch on equipment and the fact that so many of my students have no idea how to truly operate it to get the most out of it. When to change settings, how to navigate the UI, manual controls for white balance, contrast, color, time lapse, video settings and so on. I implore to get familiar with there camera, sitting down with their manual and camera and learning its menu, buttons, settings, and customizing functions and buttons. You need to know what your camera is capable of!  It's a mini computer, containing features hidden within. Know how to use it to your advantage concerning exposure to achieve the best results for the light and timing. You don't need a highend camera like a Nikon D850 or a 100 megapixel Fujifilm GFX-100, even know how to work that camera app you bought in you iPhone will make for better photos/video's in the end.  You don't always need a tripod these days for captures in low light of even waterfalls, but it helps. As for static images, I often see landscapers who almost never shoot without a tripod. Today's technology, with high ISO noise reduction in-body and lens based image stabilization, and wide aperture lens. We can shoot with confidence that our camera will get it right if you know how to use it to it's fullest potential. I do know many use layers, HDR, focus bracketing, etc, and that calls for a tripod in many cases.

But finally my point is, if you know how to set up your camera, you're familiar with it's operation, settings, modes, kelvin, noise levels and focus your chances of gaining a better outcome are assured. And don't be afraid to use RAW exposure for difficult situations. In the last few years though I will say that the latest crop of mirrorless camera's have excellent JPEG abilities.  I am amazed by the pliability of the files of recent camera's from the big 5 companies, especially Nikon.

So after you get the shot, please don't overwork it in photoshop or lightroom or what ever software you use. Be wary of your contrast, not too much, not too little. I see so many nice images ruined with too little or to much contrast. So all in all get out there, have fun and make sure you know how to get the best from your camera.  It will reward you, it will keep your mind sharp remembering just what you need to do to get the best from that light.

Thanks for stopping in! Cheers


Keywords
Archive
January February March April May June July August September (1) October November December
January February March April (1) May (1) June July August (1) September October November (1) December
January (1) February (2) March April May June July August September October November December
January February March April May June (2) July August September October (1) November December
January February March April May June July August (2) September October November (1) December
January (1) February March April May June July August September October (1) November (1) December
January (1) February March April May June July August September October November December